Skip to content
November 8, 2014 / bergelli

December Group Show

Gallery Bergelli is presenting a group exhibition of new paintings by gallery artists Pegan Brooke, Phoebe Brunner, Martin Riveros Baxter, Bryn Craig, Jeff Faust and Marisa Murrow. The exhibition will run from November 21 through December 26, 2014.

Advertisements
September 14, 2014 / bergelli

Painters Who Are Women

By Leah Triplett

The state of modern American womanhood has recently been hotly debated in popular culture. Between books like Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, or Hannah Rosin’s The End of Men, the identity, or role, of women in contemporary American society is at once fluid and firm, contested and celebrated. In 2014, a woman might be able to have a highly successful career (if she not only works hard, but loudly demands it, according to Sandberg), but she also might worry that its at the cost of her family, her home and perhaps even something of herself.

The space for women painters in the more rarified art world is no more solid. In January of this year, “The Ten Most Subversive Women Artists in History” headlined the Guardian and galled Twitter; in February, as part of the Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, people all over the globe volunteered their time and energy to create Wikipedia entries for 101 women artists in order to close the gap between the number of articles about male and female artists. The former suggests that women artists need to be outliers in order to be considered in the canon, while the latter demonstrates the startling lack of inclusion of women in Western art history. Both underscore the cultural anxiety that attends the work of women painters, a fear of relegation and access, of being either too particular or too universal, of being too anything.

It’s into this complex climate that Emma Webster, Helena Wurtzel, Amy Lincoln and Anna Valdez have surfaced as young women painters. A group of women different in age, background and region, what binds these painters is not only their gender, but their shared interest in the social, formal and expressive possibilities of abstraction. By focusing their practice towards home, these women elide the general for the particular, illuminating both the commonalities and differences of our own unique home lives. Through their self-assured command of Expressionism, which fuses abstraction and representation, these artists largely disregard the “heroic” mantle of Abstract Expressionism. Gesture and aesthetics are a vehicle through which gender refracts.

Endless Summer exhibition installation

Endless Summer exhibition installation

Webster, the youngest painter presented here, works with abstraction to explore the interiority of human relationships. Color is fantastical and electric in Webster’s work, while gesture gracefully dominates her composition. Like a Neo-Expressionist, Webster embraces the human figure; however, in her work, figuration is less concentrated, its form seemingly evaporating into abstract nature motifs. What the viewer sees is simultaneously materializing and dissolving into the composition. Just as human relationships—be they among families or friends—are constantly evolving or evaporating, Webster’s formal and figurative elements continually negotiate with each other within the picture plane. This practice allows Webster to investigate physical distance and separation within families, specifically her own. Using an Abstract idiom distinctly hers, Webster seeks to harmonize with her sister.

Emma Webster -  Ginger Where'd You Go?, 2014

Emma Webster 
Ginger Where’d You Go?, 2014

Emma Webster - Triumph of Love

Emma Webster – Triumph of Love, 2014

Emma Webster - "Mona Lisa"

Emma Webster – Mona Lisa, 2014

Wurzel also relies on color and form to emotionally charge her paintings. Primarily focused on the female form and female relationships, Wurzel uses narrative in order to investigate the truth of female experience. Wurzel’s brushwork nudding Causalism in its whimsy, her imagery constructed with bold blocks of color creating rhythmic pattern. By playing with pattern or color blocks, Wurzel seems to interrogate how femininity is constructed. Color and pattern, executed with Wurzel’s vivid stroke, are as much her subjects as women and women’s clothing. With their eyes often closed, the women in these paintings seem to be meditating, no matter if they are alone, together, in action or still. Wurzel therefore emphasizes the intellectual and interior worlds of these women, stressing the multi-faceted reality of the modern female experience, in which women are daughters, sisters, wives and mothers in addition to colleagues, bosses, teachers and leaders.

Helena Wurzel – Double Blonde, 2014

Helena Wurzel - Summer, 2014

Helena Wurzel – Summer, 2012

Helena Wurzel - Teresa, 2012

Helena Wurzel – Teresa, 2012

Helena Wurzel – Pool, 2014

Utilizing a more surrealistic aesthetic than Webster and Wurzel, Lincoln considers the varied physical world for her subjects. Depicting both plants and people with equal tenacity, Lincoln investigates the veracity of traditional genres such as portraiture and landscape painting. Lincoln’s surfaces are worked, her motifs highly detailed, as she is highly attuned to the formal qualities of picture-making. Not overtly “feminine” in her approach, Lincoln’s careful paintings articulate a tenderness towards the people and places that make up her personal and public worlds. Gesture is still strongly evident in her work, however, as Lincoln’s meticulous brushwork is activated by her use of a highly saturated and expressive palette.

amy_lincoln_desert_garden

Amy Lincoln – Desert Garden, 2014

amy_lincoln_tokyo_still_ life_2

Amy Lincoln – Tokyo Still Life #2, 2010

amy_lincoln_spring_moonlight

Amy Lincoln – Spring Moonlight, 2014

amy_lincoln_brooklyn_still_life

Amy Lincoln – Brooklyn Still Life, 2010

Valdez surveys how place, identity and ancestry formulate culture in her paintings. Probing narrative in all of her works, Valdez often depicts objects from her own household in classic still life compositions. Like Lincoln, Wurzel and Webster, Valdez employs a highly saturated palette; her use of vivid, almost Pop-like color serves to conjure a dream-like sense of the everyday. Valdez understands the domestic space anthropologically, as one that cultivates not only personal identity, but cultural meaning. Photographs, fuzzy memories, family recipes and stories merge with archeological and archival artifacts as Valdez’s source material. Exploring how patterns, textiles, plants and other elements of the house meld into a home, Valdez interprets history, heredity and heritage through an abstract visual language that evokes her place and personhood.

Anna Valdez - Picnic, 2014

Anna Valdez – Picnic, 2014

Anna Valdez - References

Anna Valdez – References, 2014

anna_valdez_japanese_silk_on_spanish_tile

Anna Valdez – Japanese Fabric on Spanish Tile

Anna Valdez - Coffee and Lavender

Anna Valdez – Coffee and Lavender

“Interestingly, younger women artists’ awareness of increasing opportunity is often accompanied by a sense of disconnection and even discomfort with feminism generally and the feminist art movement in particular,” write Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal and Sue Scott in the introduction to their seminal book, After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art. A retrospective look at the work of twelve major women artists of the 1960s, 70s, 80s and 90s, After the Revolution argues that the essential work of first-wave feminism isn’t entirely finished as much as it has transposed into contemporary gender problems. Webster, Wurtzel, Lincoln and Valdez don’t conceive such gender problems as universal, but rather, as individual. Banishing the anxiety that usually attends “Feminist Art,” these artists embrace gender and difference through the prism of painterly abstraction and abstracted representation. By asserting their individuality instead of reducing it to a generality, these artists underline the personal within the politics of feminist art. Far from being disconnected from “the movement” of the mid to late 20th century, these artists have reinterpreted it so that their singular voices can layer and accumulate into a diverse, inclusive whole, emphasizing their practice as much as politics. Painters who happen to be women, these young artists articulate a vision of contemporary experience, elevating their particular experience of home and history.

Leah Triplett is a Boston-based writer specializing in modern art. An editor of Big, Red and Shiny, she has written for Art New England, Open Letters Monthly, WBUR and others.


Endless Summer
 runs from September 4th through October 16th, 2014.

Gallery Bergelli
483 Magnolia Avenue
Larkspur, CA 94939

For more information:

bergelli.com

 

 

June 14, 2014 / bergelli

Sanjay Vora: Memories of Dreams



Artists / Exhibitions / Gallery Info / Contact www.bergelli.com

Zoom


Sanjay Vora: Memories of Dreams

May 24 – June 26, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 31
4-6pm, Artist Talk at 5pm

Gallery Hours:
Thur-Sun 11-4


Gallery Bergelli
483 Magnolia Avenue
Larkspur, CA 94939
415-945-9454
gallery@bergelli.com

Exhibition Catalog
Artist page
San Francisco Chronicle

Image: Arise, oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 72 by 58 inches, 2014

Connect with Gallery Bergelli on Facebook

Forward this email to a friend


Current Exhibition – Sanjay Vora – Memories of Dreams

~Dreams have re-emerged as memories where all desired truths become true.

Zoom

Snowy Woods
oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 72 by 66 inches

Gallery Bergelli is pleased to present “Memories of Dreams” – an exhibition of new paintings by Bay Area artist Sanjay Vora. This will be Vora’s fourth solo exhibition at Gallery Bergelli. Opening on May 24 the exhibition will continue through June 26, 2014. The opening reception will take place on Saturday, May 31 from 4 – 6 pm, with the artist discussing his work at 5 pm.

Zoom

I Follow You
oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 60 by 48 inches

In his earlier multi-layered paintings, Sanjay Vora explored the realm of love, memory and nostalgia. First painting a representation scene, often based on photographs from his childhood, the scene ultimately appeared underneath layers of veiling. Through the practice of covering and retrieving representational, figurative scenes with layers of repetitive abstraction, he encountered his own sense of history and truth with the veiling serving as a sort of curtain between the “then” and “now”.

Zoom


Blackbird

oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 36 by 36 inches

Vora’s current work, surpasses the reality of memory and enters the world of dreams. Here, memory has slowly and transparently transformed into dreams that lie in a new imagined reality of the past. Colors, light and imagery are not entirely untrue, yet they seduce and tantalize, producing scenes that transport the viewer to mindful bliss.
Dreams have re-emerged as memories where all desired truths become true. The resulting pieces know neither present nor past; rather, exist in a virtual state, impossible to fully attain, real to no one, yet fantastically familiar to all. The result is a continuation of his personal celebration of the beautiful.

Zoom


Deer in Twilight

oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 72 by 66 inches

Vora grew up in an inspirationally creative family. Born in New Jersey to classical Indian musicians, he began playing instruments at a young age; learning by ear and watching his parents perform at concerts. Vora’s urge to compose music early in life paralleled his desire to create visual images. Producing drawings and paintings was a method to bring vision to the music and forms of creativity surrounding him. Both his music and art have been strongly influenced by his bicultural upbringing, the surrounding rural landscapes of his childhood and his nostalgic nature.

Zoom


Mystical Fishing Village

oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 72 by 66 inches

In addition to an undergraduate degree in Architecture from the University of Virginia, Vora obtained a Master of Fine Arts Degree in Painting at the San Francisco Art Institute.


April 6, 2014 / bergelli

Group Show: April 2014

Gallery Bergelli

Gallery Bergelli



Artists / Exhibitions / Gallery Info / Contact www.bergelli.com

Zoom

Group Show

Thru May 15 – 2014

New work by:
Jose Basso
Bryn Craig
Carlos Catasse
Marco Farias
Santiago Garcia
Jeff Faust
Christiane Lazard
Greg Ragland
Stella Zee

Image: Anna Valdez, Sweaters, Tarts with Milk and Tea, oil on canvas, 46 by 51 inches

Connect with Gallery Bergelli on Facebook

Forward this email to a friend


Group Show | New work by Gallery Artists


Gallery Bergelli is presenting a group exhibition of new paintings by gallery artists Jose Basso, Bryn Craig, Carlos Catasse, Marco Farias, Santiago Garcia, Jeff Faust, Christiane Lazard, Greg Ragland, Stella Zee.


Jose Basso

Zoom

Jose Basso
Galpon en el Puerto
, oil on canvas, 24 by 30 inches


Jeff Faust

Zoom

Jeff Faust
A Cappella
, oil on canvas, 36 by 24 inches


Bryn Craig

Zoom

Bryn Craig
The Depot Cafe
, oil on canvas, 30 by 40 inches


Stella Zee

Zoom

Stella Zee
The Seer
, oil on canvas, 32 by 40 inches


Santiago Garcia

Zoom

Santiago Garcia
Adante
, oil on canvas, 49 by 49 inches


Greg Ragland

Zoom

Greg Ragland
A Costas Pair in Cream
, acrylic on panel, 12 by 12 inches


Carlos Catasse

Zoom

Carlos Catasse
Arbol Azul
, acrylic on canvas, 47 by 39 inches


Marco Farias

Zoom

Marco Farias
Un Arbor En El Paisaje
, oil on canvas, 18 by 24 inches


Santiago Garcia

Santiago Garcia
Red and Blue Sneakers
, oil on canvas, 47 by 47 inches

Gallery Bergelli features contemporary paintings and sculptures done by national and international artists. It presents work that is both visually exciting and technically strong in a unique and inviting art space.

It is located in an historic building in the heart of charming downtown Larkspur, California. Larkspur, known for its abundance of fine dining establishments, is about 12 miles north of San Francisco. Any art lover or collector travelling between San Francisco and the famed Northern California Wine Country will not regret making the 2 mile trek off Highway 101 to Gallery Bergelli.

Gallery Bergelli
483 Magnolia Avenue
Larkspur, CA 94939
415-945-9454
gallery@bergelli.com

Open Thursday – Sunday 11-4
Or by appointment


Forward this email to a friend

Connect with Gallery Bergelli on Facebook and Twitter

Share this announcement on Facebook |
Delicious |
Digg |
Twitter

September 22, 2013 / bergelli

Duet: Paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling

Gallery Bergelli



Artists / Exhibitions / Gallery Info / Contact www.bergelli.com

Zoom


Upcoming Exhibiton:

Duet: Paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling

October 5 – November 7

Reception: Sat, October 12
4 – 6pm

Artists Talk at 5pm

Gallery Bergelli
483 Magnolia Avenue
Larkspur, CA 94939
415-945-9454
gallery@bergelli.com

Jennifer Li – Artist page

Nicholas Oberling – Artist page

Forward this email to a friend

Images: Nicholas Oberling, Stormy Afternoon, Palace of Fine Arts, oil on canvas, 24″x36″; Jennifer Li, The Little Prince, oil on panel, 20 by 30 inches


The invented characters of Jennifer Li’s oil paintings have secrets. They stare out from the canvas with Mona Lisa half-smiles or sometimes a slight grimace. – Erika Fredrickson, Missoula Independent

Zoom

Jennifer Li
Four and Twenty Blackbirds

oil on panel, 9 by 12 inches


Zoom

Jennifer Li
The Small Tip

oil on panel, 12 by 16 inches


Oberling’s personal approach to landscape painting involves both a close study of nature and the free application of his own aesthetic onto the scenes that he observes. His works are densely detailed and highly naturalistic, but the actual scenes they portray are often drawn from his imagination. – Marti Kurth, Flathead Living Magazine

Zoom

Nicholas Oberling
Floral with Nuthatch and Sparrows

oil on canvas, 32 by 24 inches


Zoom

Nicholas Oberling
Mount Tamalpais from Belvedere

oil on canvas, 24 by 36 inches


Duet: Paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling


Gallery Bergelli is pleased to present “Duet” an exhibition of paintings by Montana-based husband and wife artists Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling. The exhibition opens October 5 and continues through November 7, 2013. Bergelli will host an Opening Reception on October 12th from 4-6pm which will highlight an Artists Talk at 5pm.

Oberling and Li have achieved national recognition and are well-respected and prominent participants in the art scene of their resident state of Montana. Li grew up on the West Coast and Oberling on the East Coast. They met while studying at the Art Students League in New York City. They settled in Kalispell in Montana’s scenic Flathead Valley, in 1998.

While studying in New York, their love of Flemish and Dutch golden age painters inspired their artistic development. There, they refined their highly skillful oil painting techniques. From metal etchings, they created oil inspirations that reflected their love of nature and the whimsical. While the artist’s both display an unparalleled skill sharing similar techniques, their work depicts no similarity in theme.

Ms. Li’s figurative paintings are contemporary genre portraits that are intellectually and psychologically compelling. Her subject matter is often of classical figures – human and animal – in scenes that are enlivened by her subtle twist on humor. Each work allows us an opportunity to contemplate an unexpected situation. Li states that “I love the idea of painting everyday things in a loving way. I love the idea of exalting ordinary objects.” Her work has been noted for its color luminosity, imaginative and evocative content and high quality of technique. The New York Times described Jennifer’s portraits as “straightforwardly beautiful” with “an element of the weird.”

Observing Nicholas Oberlings’ works, there is no doubt that nature rules. The paintings are conceived entirely in his mind’s eye. The feeling of life, depth and movement come from a combination of the mind working together with the heart, in a very free and spontaneous way. Oberling describes his approach to painting as “I paint from nature, but in an attempt to create a mood, I edit and re-arrange elements of the scene. I’m after something more timeless. After all, the physical paintings will last for hundreds of years, whereas the scenes I paint will change one way or another in a fraction of that time.” Oberling’s paintings reflect a keen observation, bursting forth with wildlife and landscape scenes delivered with a superior level of artistry. Many years of experiencing and inhaling the wonder of nature, often painted in the plein air style, is transported to the canvas in the studied techniques and philosophy, reminiscent of the great painters of the past, including Caspar David Friedrich and Frederic Edwin Church.

Nicholas Oberling was born in Athens, Greece and grew up on Long Island. His work has been exhibited at the Paris Gibson Square Museum, the Holter Museum of Art, the C. M. Russell Museum, and the Hockaday Museum of Art. His painting Wild Goose Island is in the permanent collection of the Hockaday Museum of Art. He is a founding member of the Montana Painters Alliance. He has been Artist in Residence at Glacier National Park and the Helena National Forest.

Jennifer Li grew up in Mill Valley, California and spent many summers at a ranch in Montana. Her work has been featured at the Holter Museum in Helena, Montana, the John Pence Gallery in San Francisco, the Union League Club in New York, and the Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell, Montana.

A California Montana connection exists in this exhibition, as the owner of Gallery Bergelli is herself a native Montanan who relocated to San Francisco in 1992 and later to Marin. She visits Montana often and shares a deep affection for her home state with the artists.


Gallery Bergelli features contemporary paintings and sculptures done by national and international artists. It presents work that is both visually exciting and technically strong in a unique and inviting art space.

It is located in an historic building in the heart of charming downtown Larkspur, California. Larkspur, known for its abundance of fine dining establishments, is about 12 miles north of San Francisco. Any art lover or collector travelling between San Francisco and the famed Northern California Wine Country will not regret making the 2 mile trek off Highway 101 to Gallery Bergelli.

Open Thursday – Sunday 11-4
Or by appointment


Forward this email to a friend

Connect with Gallery Bergelli on Facebook and Twitter

Share this announcement on Facebook |
Delicious |
Digg |
Twitter

June 2, 2013 / bergelli

Pegan Brooke: Ten Years of Water reception and artist talk

Gallery Bergelli is proud to announce “Ten Years of Water” a solo exhibition of paintings by Bay Area artist Pegan Brooke. Opening June 6, with the Gallery Reception on June 8th from 4-6pm, and Artist Talk at 5pm, the exhibition continues through July 10, 2013.
30 paintings created in the last ten years will be presented in this survey exhibition. “Ten Years of Water” will consist of colorful river paintings inspired by observation of the river in Pont Aven, France, together with a collection of subtle sea paintings inspired by the Bolinas coast as well as the gorgeous shimmery canvases from the most recent body of work inspired by the high snow-covered mountains in Sun Valley.

May 10, 2013 / bergelli

Ten Years of Water

Gallery Bergelli is proud to announce “Ten Years of Water” a solo exhibition of paintings by Bay Area artist Pegan Brooke. Opening June 6, with the Gallery Reception on June 8th from 4-6pm, and Artist Talk at 5pm, the exhibition continues through July 10, 2013.

Pegan Brooke creates ethereal abstract works that take their cues from the natural environment. Marked by rising and receding color fields, structured by natural patterns and rhythms, “Brooke’s canvases communicate a sense of awe of the world around her, enveloping the viewer in meditative depictions of beauty that alternately soothe and stimulate.” –Anne C. Ray, Marin Magazine

30 paintings created in the last ten years will be presented in this survey exhibition. “Ten Years of Water” will consist of colorful river paintings inspired by observation of the river in Pont Aven, France, together with a collection of subtle Sea paintings inspired by the Bolinas Coast as well as the gorgeous shimmery canvases from the most recent body of work inspired by the high snow mountains in Sun Valley.

Pegan Brooke’s paintings have been exhibited for many years, including exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum, SFMOMA, Oakland Museum, San Diego Museum of Art, Des Moines Art Center and Museum, Sao Paulo Biennale and the Monterey Museum of Art. Brooke is a recipient of a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Artist Grant, two Marin Arts Council Grants, and an alternate award for the Prix de Rome. She was also awarded Artist in Residency fellowships at the Millay Colony for the Arts in New York and five residencies at the Pont Aven School of Contemporary Art in France. Brooke’s paintings have been reviewed in numerous publications, including The LA Times, The SF Examiner, The New York Times and Art in America. Pegan Brooke’s work is held in numerous public and private collections, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, U.S. Embassies in Sri Lanka and Bolivia, Mills College, University of Nebraska Art Museum, State of Iowa Capitol Building, Bank of America International Headquarters, Standard Oil Corporation, Prudential Insurance Company, Security Pacific Bank, Oracle Headquarters, Meredith Corporation, McDonald Corporation, The Principal Financial Group, Unocal Corporation, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Anderson Collection, Roselyn Swig Collection, Charles R. Schwab, and Steven Chase Collection.

%d bloggers like this: