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September 2, 2012 / bergelli

Fall 2012 – Group Show – New work by Gallery Artists

Gallery Bergelli



Artists / Exhibitions / Gallery Info / Contact www.bergelli.com

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Thru October 17, 2012

Fall Group Show

New Work by Gallery Artists

Alexandra Eldridge
Allen Wynn
Daniel Tousignant
Deva Graf
Dona Blakely
James Leonard
Jane Smaldone
Jose Basso
Lorenzo Moya
Paul Pratchenko
Sanjay Vora

Gallery Bergelli
483 Magnolia Avenue
Larkspur, CA 94939
415-945-9454
gallery@bergelli.com

Image: Deva Graf, Gakko
Unfired Clay
31 by 10 inches

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New Artist – Deva Graf

Deva Graf lives in San Francisco and works in Sausalito, CA. She has exhibited her work internationally in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including the 2006 Whitney Biennial.

Deva began intensive study with Zen Master Joshu Sasaki Roshi in 2005 after completing her M.F.A., and taking a leave from her position at the University of Illinois at Chicago as an Associate Professor. She moved to the Mt. Baldy Zen Center, located in the San Gabrielle Mountains of Southern California, to study Zen full time.

While she was living at the Mt. Baldy Zen Center, Roshi told Deva “I need your statues!” and he asked her to start making Buddha statues. He has instructed, guided and directly worked with her in this process. Deva first met Roshi when she was two years old, while living with her family at the Bodhi Manda Zen Center, located in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. She started meditating as a teenager and began her Zen training when she was sixteen years old.

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Deva Graf
Yakushi
, Bronze on wood pedestal, 41 by 16 inches


New Artist – Alexandra Eldridge

Alexandra Eldridge’s mixed-media paintings have been acclaimed for their symbolic imagery, rich colors, textures, and devotion to the written word.

Alexandra works in mixed media on paper or panel. She uses Venetian plaster and creates images with pigment, pencil, and elements of collage. She rarely uses paint, instead she scratches through layers of the plaster to make lines. She burnishes the final layer to make the work shine and reveal the colors beneath. The colorful surfaces are distressed and incised with symbols, words, phrases and collage. Eldridge has said her paintings have a narrative, but without a beginning or end. The artist has described the process as an attempt to seek the unknown, “to go deeply in to the heart of the mystery, to make the soul fly out of things. I’ll go into the studio and begin. I may be in some curious state of being. I’ll paint for a number of hours, and then, all of a sudden it reveals itself to me—what’s going on with me. Tears start coming up and all the other strong feelings. All this conspires and works together. I’m in a state of joy — near ecstasy — when I’m painting. Art is about an encounter with something — whether it be the unseen, an emotion, a feeling — and then you have to have the courage to collaborate with that. My work also has a lot to do with the need to sensually connect to another or to my own deepest regions. Love motivates me enormously.”

Eldridge has had dozens of solo exhibitions and participated in many group shows throughout the United States and abroad, including New York, Paris, Belgrade and London. Her work has been used on covers of eight books of poetry. Celebrity collectors include actors Steve Buscemi, Edie Falco and William Hurt who said, “there are two tides, one of light and another of muffling, suffocating…absence. Alexandra is clearly in the light.”

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Alexandra Eldridge
Eat and Drink Thy Bliss
, mixed media on board, 24 by 24 inches


Dona Blakely

“My technique combines the layering of oil glazes and egg tempera with the application of gold leaf. I paint on linen, panel, parchment, or paper. The surfaces of my paintings are repeatedly cracked, layered, and sanded and have great visual depth and intricacy and must be seen in person to appreciate. I have arrived at my present technique through the personal study of religious icons, frescos and illuminated manuscripts.” – Dona Blakely

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Dona Blakely
Calypso
, oil on canvas, 55.5 by 32 inches

Sanjay Vora

In his large-scale, multi-layered paintings, Sanjay Vora explores the realm of love, memory and nostalgia through a process of covering and retrieving representational, figurative scenes with layers of repetitive abstraction. His works have been shown in the United States including San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Connecticut and Virginia. He was invited to participate in the Second International Biennale of Contemporary Art in Ferrara, Italy in December 2004. In his most recent exhibition, the Second Biennial International Juried Exhibition in San Francisco, he received a “Best In Show” award, and during his graduate study, he was awarded with a merit scholarship and two teaching assistantships from the San Francisco Art Institute. In 2002, he obtained a BS in Architecture from the University of Virginia and received an MFA in painting from the San Francisco Art Institute in May 2005.

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Sanjay Vora
Girls,
oil, acrylic and gel medium on canvas, 48 by 72 inches

Daniel Tousignant

“Looking at the work of San Francisco artist Daniel Tousignant is like staring at a freeze frame of the best dream you’ve ever had, and the effect is a sudden wash of chest-clutching happiness. The beauty evoked by his landscape is so intense that it elevates them into the realm of abstraction, even though on the surface they’re utterly representative. There is some living depth, all the more fascination for its hiddenness, breathing behind every leafy branch. The artist says that trees reflect the beauty and vulnerability of all living things. Maybe this vulnerability is what we see just under the surface of his canvasses, and what elicits such a visceral reaction to his work.” – Metropolitan Magazine, Barcelona Spain

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Daniel Tousignant, Two Trees – Blue, oil on canvas, 60 by 40 inches

Jose Basso

Charles Baudelaire, the great nineteenth century art connoisseur and critic, once stated, that “Pure draughtsmen are philosophers and dialecticians. Colorists are poets.” Painted with a palette of crashed jewels, the landscapes of Jose Basso are pure visual poetry. His extraordinary realm of color is unlike anything that has come before it, gaining his respect and critical acclaim as one of the most unique visionaries of our time.

Born in Chile in 1949, Basso quickly attained fame and recognition in his own country, and by 1978 he had started exhibiting throughout Europe and the United States. The next two decades brought tremendous success including scholarships, awards, and multiple opportunities to represent his country in international juried exhibitions. His works have been admired and collected by Chilean President Ricardo Lagos and the Queen of Spain Sophia de Borbon. Perhaps most notably, however, he was selected in 2007 to create a mural for the headquarters of the O.E.A. in Washington, D.C.

As a true master of contemporary art, Basso is admired not only for his tremendous skill but also for conceiving of a style that has never been executed before. Basso’s landscapes are powerful in their simplicity and dramatic in their boldly contrasting colors. Punctuated only by minimal houses and trees, his horizons are at once intense and serene. In is Basso’s ability to create such a dichotomy in a single harmonious work that sets him apart as one of the most innovative artists working today. – Essay by Lauren Paul

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Jose Basso
Nube en Horizonte
, oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

Jane Smaldone

Jane Smaldone was born in New York City in 1953 and currently lives and works in the Boston area with her husband Mark and daughter Isabel, who has become one of her favorite subjects. She attended the State University of New York and attained her BFA in painting from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1976.

Smaldone’s paintings combine her long-standing interest in landscape, still life and portraiture, interweaving the genres in a personal style inspired by art historical traditions as diverse as Chinese landscape painting, Surrealism and Folk Art.

She says about her work, “The Flowers, portraits and landscapes that I have been working on are inspired in part by a dialogue between the real and the imagined. My subjects tend to be those important to my life and evocative for me in a visual, emotional or psychic way.

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Jane Smaldone
The White Squirrel
, oil on linen, 26 by 23 inches

Paul Pratchenko

“It is my intention that these paintings and drawings ask questions and hopefully provide answers regarding how we see, experience and remember the world. They confront basic philosophical concerns such as the relationship between “appearance” and “reality”. The works focus on the learned knowledge we refer to when we consider our place on the earth. Even given our attempts to be empirical, these visual and idiosyncratic preconceptions play a considerable part in our perceptions. Akin to sub atomic physics, they affect how we form and ask questions, in part determining the answers, which in turn influences where we arrive at.” – Paul Pratchenko

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Paul Pratchenko
Dissolution Of The Familiar
, acrylic on canvas, 25 by 43 inches

Lorenzo Moya

Lorenzo Moya was born in Santiago, Chile in 1967. He studied architecture before devoting himself to art. He received his degree in art from the University of Chile.

His style is quintessentially Latin. Mystical figures are superimposed. Mysterious landscapes and theatrical architecture display seemingly contradictory states of dreaming and reality. His surrealistic scenes serve as stage sets for the mind. Certain objects are recurring – the table with a white linen cloth, the narrow streets with light streaming out from doorways, and outdated ships, planes, or cars, waiting. In Moya’s world, all is waiting for something to happen. Trails and urban landscapes are wrapped in the magic of the unexpected. Light and water are important elements – his paintings are pleas to safeguard the planet. According to Moya, “Painting light is impossible. It’s like painting an angel.” His work proves otherwise. Women are prominent in many of his paintings – strong, larger than life, but graceful. They are enmeshed in the scene, with the sea or land visible through their skirts.

His work has been exhibited in the U.S., South America, and Central America.

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Lorenzo Moya
El Mundo De Sofia
, oil on canvas, 35.5 by 67 inches

James Leonard

Art has always been the focus of my life. As such, art, like life, is a process. Just as our lives unfold in unique and beautiful ways, so do my paintings have their own, unique individual expression. As an artist, I strive to guide each painting to its fulfillment. The process is like a circle, without beginning or end. – James Leonard

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James Leonard
Winter Meets Spring
, acrylic on canvas, 60 by 60 inches
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